All Courses

Our academic program offers you the opportunity to pursue areas of interest, and to explore your passions.

Whether your explorations and inclinations are bound to a traditional academic discipline – the arts, the social sciences, English, science, or math – or across such boundaries, for example when studying architecture, robotics, environmental issues, or the Arab world, we can offer you a supportive environment. Below is a sampling of all the courses we offer.

  • Marine Science

    Combining a study of the biological, physical, and chemical aspects of the marine environment, this non-laboratory course stresses interrelationships and therefore focuses on specific ecosystems, including coastlines, estuaries, marshes, coral reefs, and the open ocean. A field trip provides opportunity to learn analytical techniques and to study the distribution of organisms.

  • Introduction to Arabic (Online course offering)

    Introduction to Arabic is a team-taught pilot online course offered by the Eight Schools Association. It is a student-centered course integrating synchronous and asynchronous learning and learning tools. Students work with a variety of online media to master the Arabic alphabet and sounds, build vocabulary, acquire basic grammar and sentence structures, and read and comprehend Modern Standard Arabic. Students are also expected to speak about themselves, their families and their environment, to sustain and maintain basic conversations, and to compose several paragraphs about these topics. This course focuses on Modern Standard Arabic with an exposure to Levantine colloquial through music, songs, and short videos. By the end of this course, students will have both a solid command of basic linguistic structures and skills, in addition to a better understanding and appreciation of Arabic culture. Throughout the course, students’ linguistic progress is assessed via weekly projects and presentations.

  • Intensive Beginning Arabic, Honors

    This course introduces students to Modern Standard Arabic, the written and formal spoken language of almost 200 million people from Morocco to Iraq, with an equal emphasis on reading, writing, speaking, and listening. By the end of this course, students are expected to have a solid knowledge of the Arabic alphabet and sounds, to read and comprehend Arabic at a basic level, to speak about themselves, their families and their environment, and to write short paragraphs concerning their daily life. This course is based on a communicative approach. Therefore, while students do most of the preparation and learning of new material outside class, we create speaking and listening opportunities within the classroom introducing grammar through practical situations. Our aim is to raise students’ interest and motivation and to challenge them with the use of activities that appeal to their intelligence. Moreover, students are exposed to elements of Arab culture such as music, songs, poetry, and culinary arts.

  • Second Year Arabic, Honors

    In this course, students learn extensive vocabulary and encounter more advanced grammar and complex sentence structure. This course aims to develop students’ reading, writing, listening, and comprehension skills by using authentic Arabic materials. Emphasis is placed on pronunciation and communication skills to encourage students to communicate meaningfully in the target language. By the end of this course, students reach an intermediate level of linguistic proficiency and are expected to give oral presentations and to craft lengthy essays. Also, students in this course are exposed to Levantine colloquial Arabic, which facilitates practice of the language for everyday life, e.g., personal introductions, shopping, etc.

  • Third Year Arabic, Honors

    In this course, students are expected to manage extensive readings in Modern Standard Arabic, comprehend lengthy authentic listening materials and follow-up discussions on a variety of social, cultural, and political topics by using argumentative discourse, and give extended oral presentations with facility. Emphasis is also placed on developing the stylistic aspects of their writing. By the end of this course, students acquire a broader range of vocabulary and more fluency in speaking and reach a high intermediate level of proficiency in Arabic. Students in this course continue exposure to Levantine colloquial Arabic, which allows them to communicate domestic needs and to participate in daily social interactions.

  • Introductory Classical Chinese, Honors

    Classical Chinese is the only language in the world that has a rich, unbroken wealth of texts from 25 centuries, including famous works such as The Art of War, The Analects of Confucius, and The Ballad of Mulan. The aim of this course is to read Classical Chinese in order to gain a unique insight into the thought and culture of East Asia. The course has both a linguistic and a social studies element, combining a ‘Classics’ style approach with a historical/ cultural approach. Students learn to read Classical Chinese from scratch, gradually building up from words and phrases into sentences and finally texts. Instruction is in English, but correct pronunciation of the original texts is also taught. Students learn using traditional rather than simplified characters. In addition, students read scholarship in English to gain a broad overview of the sources of East Asian culture. Topics include Ancient Chinese philosophy, poetry, art, and literature. Assignments include a research paper in English about an aspect of Chinese traditional thought or culture.

  • Beginning Chinese

    In this beginning course students learn pronunciation patterns, tones, and basic grammatical structures. For oral practice and conversation, approximately 500 words are introduced. For reading and writing, students learn 400 Chinese characters. Units on Chinese history and culture complement the language portion of the course.

  • Elementary Chinese

    This accelerated version of first year Chinese is designed for students who have had some previous exposure to the Chinese language. Though the Beginning and Elementary Chinese courses follow the same base curriculum and methodology, speaking, listening, reading, and writing are covered in greater depth in this accelerated course.

  • Second Year Chinese, Honors

    Students continue to work on Chinese grammar and vocabulary and approximately double their knowledge of vocabulary words and characters. Students are able to read and write short passages on familiar and personal topics. Units on Chinese history and culture help students develop a broader understanding and appreciation for their study of the language.

  • Second Year Chinese

    Students continue to work on Chinese grammar and vocabulary and approximately double their knowledge of vocabulary words and characters. Students are able to read and write short passages on familiar and personal topics. Units on Chinese history and culture help students develop a broader understanding and appreciation for their study of the language.

  • Third Year Chinese, Honors

    This intermediate course gives students the opportunity to expand their oral and written knowledge of Chinese so that they are able to read short stories and discuss daily life topics in the target language. Students continue to build vocabulary with the addition of 400 new Chinese characters and 500 new words. In addition, the study of Chinese history and culture remain an integral part of the course.

  • Third Year Chinese

    This intermediate course gives students the opportunity to expand their oral and written knowledge of Chinese so that they are able to read short stories and discuss daily life topics in the target language. Students continue to build vocabulary with the addition of 400 new Chinese characters and 500 new words. In addition, the study of Chinese history and culture remain an integral part of the course.

  • Chinese for Heritage Speakers, Honors

    This year-long course is designed to meet the specific needs of students of Chinese heritage who are new to Choate and have some aural and oral proficiency but more limited ability in reading and writing Chinese. The purpose of instruction is to utilize previous language background to lay a solid foundation for further study of Chinese language, literature, and culture. The course emphasizes three modes of communication, with special focus on reading and writing. It includes a study of Chinese culture and society as it is embedded in language, and is intended to give students a better understanding of Chinese culture, history, and social values. As the course progresses, students are gradually introduced to projects aimed at developing critical thinking and analytical capabilities, skills that will help them succeed as they move forward in our Chinese curriculum.

  • Fourth Year Chinese, Honors

    This advanced course aims to help students solidify their knowledge of spoken and written Chinese. Students develop reading strategies to comprehend material composed in formal written Chinese. Authentic resources (literature, newspapers, magazines, and radio and television programs) are used. This course prepares students to continue their study of Chinese at an advanced level in college.

  • Fourth Year Chinese

    This advanced course aims to help students solidify their knowledge of spoken and written Chinese. Students develop reading strategies to comprehend material composed in formal written Chinese. Authentic resources (literature, newspapers, magazines, and radio and television programs) are used. This course prepares students to continue their study of Chinese at an advanced level in college.

  • Contemporary Chinese Culture and Society

    The objective of this course is to advance students’ language proficiency with intensive reading and writing. The course is also designed to enhance students’ understanding of the social and cultural transformation in contemporary China that resulted from the Economic Reform of 1978. Classes emphasize oral communication by means of oral presentations, debates, and discussions. Written essays and projects also contribute to the development of a wider vocabulary and an ability to communicate with greater precision in Chinese.

  • Chinese Cinema Since 1980: Art and Society

    This course discusses influential Chinese films since 1980 as artwork and as reflections of China’s cultural, social, economic, and political changes in the past three decades. Assignments are designed to help students develop proficiency in reading authentic materials, writing essays, and giving oral and written presentations.

  • AP Chinese Language and Culture

    This Advanced Placement course emphasizes the active use of Chinese for oral and written communication. It provides students opportunities to further develop their proficiencies across the three communicative modes—interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational—and the five goal areas—communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities as outlined by the American Council for the Teaching of Foreign Languages. The course engages students in exploring both contemporary and historical Chinese culture. Course content reflects a wide range of themes such as global awareness, family and community, science and technology, and literature and art. Throughout the course, both formative and summative assessments are frequent and are linked to the content and skills which comprise the learning goals of each thematic unit. The course will be taught exclusively in Chinese. It provides students with maximum exposure to authentic culture and language.

  • Contemporary Issues in China, Honors

    This advanced Chinese language and culture course focuses on current affairs and social issues in contemporary China. Using multimedia materials ranging from the Internet, television, and films to traditional textbooks, students explore issues that include China’s market reform, changing family structure, environmental protection, cinema, and education. Students in this course are immersed in a Chinese-language environment and should be prepared to discuss these issues in Chinese. Written assignments and projects are frequent.

  • Chinese in the Cyber Age, Honors

    This course is a guided exploration of cultural products accessible online as instruments of Chinese language learning, from blogs, forums, advertisements, and commercials to television movies and video clips. Students transcribe, annotate, analyze, and present materials both assigned and self-compiled to rediscover and reconstruct China’s socio-cultural realities in the cyber age. Reading and writing are routine tasks and oral discussion and debates are important components of the course. Conducted entirely in Chinese, this course is open to advanced students who have taken AP Chinese or have the equivalent background as determined by the department.

  • Contemporary Chinese Fiction: Mirror of Social Change (1949-Present), Honors

    Contemporary Chinese literary texts created after 1949 up to the present mirror a series of political, social, cultural, and ideological dilemmas of China. The class discusses fundamental issues of ideology, politics, morality, and new literary developments resulting from the drastic social transformation during this period. Reading and writing are routine tasks and oral discussion and debates are important components of the course. Conducted entirely in Chinese, this course is open to advanced students who have taken AP Chinese or have the equivalent background as determined by the department.

  • Beginning French

    This introductory course uses immersion to build communicative skills in French. Grammar, basic speaking proficiency, correct pronunciation, listening comprehension, and the ability to read short articles and stories and write simple idiomatic French are important components of the course. Classes, which are conducted mostly in French from the first day, employ a range of communicative activities, from role-playing to group dialogues. Espaces, the digital learning program used in this course, contains an online component that provides instant feedback on most exercises, as well as interactive video and listening activities that allow students to record and review their speech. In the spring term, students read a short French-language novel designed for beginning students. The course culminates with the first benchmark exam, designed to evaluate reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Open to students with no previous background in French.

  • Elementary French

    This course is designed to help students with some previous experience in French improve their comprehension and application of the language. Though Beginning French and Elementary French follow the same base curriculum and methodology, speaking, listening, reading, and writing may be covered in greater depth in this accelerated course, depending on the strength of the class.

  • Second Year French

    Development and reinforcement of the four language skills are continued, with emphasis on expanding vocabulary, verb tenses, and use of pronouns. Simple compositions and a variety of in-class activities reinforce the material and enhance students’ idiomatic fluency. The class reads short texts and a novel designed for intermediate French students, and Francophone cultures are integrated into the course. Students continue using the Espaces online learning system, complete with interactive video and audio materials stressing modern communication that is both accurate and colloquial.

  • Second Year French, Honors

    This is an honors course in grammar, reading, composition, and conversation whose base curriculum covers what is achieved in but in greater depth and at a brisker pace overall. Because of the rigor expected in the course, student progress is monitored closely in the fall term to assess appropriate placement.

  • Third Year French

    Language skills and cultural appreciation acquired in the first two years are reinforced and extended through review, conversation, expository and analytical writing, films, music, and readings of short texts, poetry, and at least one full-length work. The Imaginez interactive online program provides instant feedback on grammar exercises, substantial listening activities, and relevant and provocative short films that explore various aspects of the Francophone world.

  • Third Year French, Honors

    Extensive grammar review, consideration of unabridged literary works with accompanying films, expository and analytical writing, and in-class discussions constitute the core of this honors course, whose base curriculum covers at least what is achieved in FR300, but in greater depth and at a brisker pace overall. Because of the rigor expected in the course and the level of discourse encountered in the material, student progress is monitored closely in the fall term to assess appropriate placement.

  • French in a Global Context

    In addition to intensive grammar review, this series of courses explores the literature, art, history, politics, film, and culture of several countries in the French-speaking world. Virtual Internet travel to North Africa, the Caribbean, Vietnam, and Quebec, all regions colonized at one time by France, is aimed at a globally informed understanding of French and American roles in current world events. Topics studied include Islam, polygamy, the separation of church and state, immigration, and cultural differences in media coverage and in nuclear family dynamics. For the spring term project, students impersonate an immigrant to present-day France from one of the countries covered in the fall and the winter terms. Through creating personal diaries and photo albums of their initial experiences as foreigners in France, and sharing music and poetry from their homelands, “student-immigrants” rely on the grammar and vocabulary studied throughout the year to express their familiarity with the concepts of identity, empathy, and cultural diplomacy.

  • French Literature, Honors: Enlightenment, Romanticism, Modernism

    In this honors literature sequence, a survey of canonical works is the focus as we move through the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. In the fall, works by the philosophes of the French Enlightenment— Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot, and Rousseau—are studied as sources of inspiration for the French Revolution and as foundations for the modern sensibility. In the winter term, Romantic poetry and selections from novelists such as Balzac, Flaubert, and Zola are considered as we move toward the Belle Epoque, signaling the modern era. In the spring, selections by Colette, Giraudoux, Ionesco, Sartre, and Camus are featured. Compositions, class discussions, analysis of texts, and focused grammar study help students develop their skills as students of language and literature. During each term students read at least one major work in its entirety as well as excerpts from other important contributions to that century. Each term features a major research project based on a painting or other non-literary document of the period and a related presentation in class.

  • The Francophone Press: Modern Journalism, Audiovisual Media, and the Power of Social Media

    In this series of courses, students examine current events and explore the ways in which they are relayed to various audiences in the printed press, audiovisual media, and electronic media. Students explore international and local French-language news stories, documentaries from various sources, and events that have been instigated or influenced by social media. The goal of this course is to foster critical thought in the production and analysis of news stories regarding political and social change. The culminating project of this course each term is the creation of a journalistic pathway (e.g., blog, documentary, talk show, social media site), in which students demonstrate their newly acquired journalistic lexicon and skills to relate news, craft a story, and influence opinion via social media.

  • AP French Language and Culture

    The primary goal of this theme-based course is to prepare students to understand and communicate in sophisticated and accurate French on topics ranging from ecology and conservation to politics, law, and current events. The course focuses on three modes of communication: interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational. The course includes intensive grammar review, francophone literature, press clippings and up-to-date newscasts, radio broadcasts, and short films. Students compose creative writing exercises, including dialogues, correspondence, fictional prose, news articles, and analytical compositions while acquiring new topical vocabulary and reinforcing complex structures. Furthermore, students tackle contemporary and historical controversies in the francophone world through research and debate. Students prepare authentic testing materials as prescribed for the AP Examination in French Language and Culture, and use media to record original responses and presentations.

  • Voices of France’s Youth, Honors

    Today in France, teenagers and young adults are a powerful force in art and politics. This course examines works composed in the French language by authors younger than 30 years of age. Blogs, books written in text message format, graphic novels, current slang terms, video clips, poems, websites, songs, short stories and film are studied as students explore the following questions: What are the current preoccupations of France’s youth? What rhetorical strategies do young French writers use to convey their message? How do young French writers view themselves in relation to older, more established authors? Is the voice of France’s youth more powerful than that of young people in the U.S.? Why or why not? How do French youth view Americans?

  • French Theater and Acting, Honors

    Theater reflects society’s passions, fears, and aspirations; it is a living creation, alternately embracing and abandoning the written word in an insatiable quest to capture fleeting realities and define the human spirit. This course explores theatrical works and critical texts from the 17th century to the present, questioning evolving artistic and cultural values, dramaturgy, production aesthetics, and acting techniques, to culminate in student written, directed, and acted scenes reflecting modern society through the aesthetic confines of the neoclassical, romanticist, existentialist, and absurdist genres. Works include: Ryngaert’s Introduction à l’analyse du théâtre, Naugrette’s L’esthétique théâtrale, and Héril’s Entraînement théâtral pour les adolescents : A partir de quinze ans, as well as the theatrical writings of Corneille, Molière, Racine, Marivaux, Beaumarchais, de Musset, Hugo, Stendhal, Zola, Guitry, Genêt, Sartre, Artaud, Beckett, Ionesco, and Serrault.

  • Nature and Human Nature, Honors Une Étude De La Littérature De La Méchanceté Et De La Compassion Humaines

    What happens when human beings are threatened by a humanitarian crisis? What compels people to risk their own welfare to save others? What is one’s personal responsibility when faced with the suffering of others? We will examine these questions through the prism of various French language genres from different countries and eras (e.g., France during World War II, Rwanda in the 20th century). We will also consider relevant issues in current Francophone media. Possible texts include La Peste, La Guerre de Troie n’aura pas lieu, Un homme ordinaire and J’ai serré la main au diable, among others. Possible films include “Intouchables,” “Joyeux Noël,” “La Rafle.” Individual essays, journal reflections, and the occasional reading quiz will help students build towards collaborative projects: teams of students will produce presentations analyzing and comparing the works we read.

  • Poésie De Langue Française, Honors

    In this term-long course, students read and study poetry from the 15th century through the present day with a nod to poetic origins found in the chansons de geste of the French Middle Ages. Students study the different genres of poetry, poetic forms, and versification. Poems range from the sonnets pétrarquistes of the French 15th and 16th centuries and La Fontaine’s fables of the 17th century, through Apollinaire’s calligrammes of the early 20th century, to poetry of the Francophone world. The selected poetry represents most of the major literary movements (classicism, romanticism, realism, surrealism) as well as defining historical events in France (poetry of the French Revolution and of the French Resistance). Excerpts of classical plays (by Corneille and Molière) may also be examined for their poetic elements. Most importantly this course initiates college-bound students of French in the preparation of explications de texte (oral and written) about a work of literature. Other course work includes reading poems (and essays related to poetry), tests and quizzes about versification and poetic figures, and occasional memorized recitations of poetry.

  • Ennui, Adultery, and Death in Madame Bovary

    In this course, students read Flaubert’s famous first novel, a story of passion and transgression that was attacked as obscene and scandalous by public prosecutors in 1856. In addition, the course examines the trial surrounding the publication of Madame Bovary and the novel’s historical and aesthetic context. Most importantly, the class reads the entire work in the original French, continuing to analyze it in essays and oral presentations using the French tradition of the explication de texte. Also part of the course are film versions of the novel and a brief overview of the influence of Madame Bovary on 20th century English and American fiction.

  • French Cinema

    From the Lumière brothers’ invention of the cinématographe in 1895 to the New Wave movement and beyond, the French continue to leave an indelible mark on the cinematic medium. In this course, we will study films by such influential cineastes as Abel Gance, Georges Méliès, Jean Renoir, Henri-Georges Cluzot, François Truffaut, Jean-Luc Godard, Agnès Varda, Jacques Demy and Jean-Pierre Jeunet. Students will analyze the technical aspects of filmmaking, as well as the historical and cultural contexts of each work, and strive to develop their own critical voice as they increase their knowledge of the building blocks of cinema. The course will culminate in an original final project, for which students will create a scenario, prepare the shot-by-shot cinematography, cast, film, and edit a short film, incorporating influences from the works studied throughout the term.

  • Intensive Beginning Greek, Honors

    This honors course is for highly motivated language students who want to learn Classical Greek. Students rapidly learn the alphabet and phonology of the language while acquiring reading skills using ancient texts. Students must be willing to memorize a large quantity of vocabulary and morphology, and knowledge of advanced grammar in another language is essential. By the end of the course, students are able to read and appreciate authentic excerpts from Homer’s Iliad.

  • Intensive Beginning Italian, Honors

    This introductory honors course for highly motivated and enthusiastic language learners stresses grammar and vocabulary, basic speaking proficiency, correct pronunciation, listening comprehension, and the ability to read and write simple idiomatic Italian. Classes, which are conducted mostly in Italian from the first day, employ a range of communicative activities and make use of video and audio materials out of class via the Internet and resources provided at the Language Media Lab.

  • Beginning Latin

    This course, with formal instruction in grammar, concentrates on bringing students quickly to the stage of reading Latin with confidence. The basal text, Wheelock’s Latin, is supplemented by additional resources to provide students with insight into historical events from the Founding of Rome to the middle Republican era. Grammar topics include the present and perfect systems for all verbs and three of the five noun declensions. Etymological discussions and practice with derivatives enable students to improve skills in English vocabulary and grammar.

  • Second Year Latin

    Using Wheelock’s Latin as the core text, students continue the study of grammatical constructions essential to reading Latin. Study focuses on reinforcement of first year material, followed by study of the passive voice, the final two declensions, and introduction to the subjunctive. By the spring term, students will have begun practice of reading Latin at sight, with selections from Martial, Catullus, and Cicero. Historical discussions include the period from the Second Punic War to the fall of the Republic and the Birth of the Empire. Open to students who have completed the 100 level or its equivalent.

  • Second Year Latin, Honors

    Using Wheelock’s Latin as the core text but moving at a significantly accelerated pace, students complete their study of Latin grammar, covering the passive voice, the fourth and fifth noun declensions, and all common uses of the subjunctive. Historical discussions include the period from the Second Punic War to the fall of the Republic and the Birth of the Empire. By the spring term, students become comfortable reading Latin passages at sight, including selections from Martial, Ovid, Catullus, and Cicero. The advanced pace and in-depth study of the material restricts this class to very qualified students that have completed the 100 level or its equivalent and have the recommendation of the department.

  • Third Year Latin

    This class is divided into two units. In the opening months, students complete their study of the basic Latin grammar, finishing the Wheelock’s Latin textbook and taking advantage of supplementary reading passages. Among the topics of study are advanced uses of noun cases and the subjunctive mood. In the second half of the course, students turn to regular study of authentic Latin, beginning with short passages taken from a variety of authors and then focusing on longer, more complicated works. Examples include Cicero’s First Catilinarian Oration and Ovid’s Metamorphoses.

  • Third Year Latin, Honors

    Students with superior Latin skills may be recommended for this honors course that focuses on reading classical prose and poetry and explores the historical context of the readings. Possible choices of material include Cicero’s First Catilinarian Oration, Ovid’s Metamorphoses, and the Odes of Horace. Students are expected to draw from supplementary readings and participate in discussions about the elements of style involved in oratory and poetry, ultimately being challenged to improve their skills in literary criticism.

  • Fourth Year Latin

    Students at this level turn themselves to the dedicated and concentrated study of individual authors and specific works of literature, one text per term. Examples of study include the Carmina of Catullus, Historia Apollonii Regis Tyri, Cicero’s Somnium Scipionis, Vergil’s Aeneid, and the Epistulae of Cicero. Students are expected to read academic journal articles detailing context, style, and interpretation of the texts and respond to arguments, utilizing skills in analysis and argumentative writing. Class discussion aims to move past the discussion of simple translation and into the realm of interpretation.

  • AP Latin

    Students in this course follow the AP syllabus and read extensive selections from Vergil’s Aeneid and Caesar’s Bellum Gallicum. Attention is given to literary interpretation, history, and cultural elements of the two works with significant supplemental reading in English. Students who succeed in this course are well prepared to take the AP Examination.

  • Topics In Ancient Roman Literature

    This sequence of intensive reading courses presents three distinct elements of Ancient Roman literature in a seminar-style class; one topic each term selected by the instructor. Examples of possible topics include: Lyric Poets and Poetry, Hellenistic Philosophy in Rome, Theater and Early Comedy, The History of the Roman Republic, and Latin Composition. The sequence focuses on reading ancient sources while analyzing them through the lens of modern critics. Authors read and/or emulated include but are not limited to: Catullus, Horace, Lucretius, Seneca, Plautus, Terence, Livy, Sallust, Cicero, Ovid, and Propertius. Advanced reading and translation skills are necessary.

  • Beginning Spanish

    Students with little or no previous exposure to Spanish are introduced to the basic elements of the language and to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Emphasis is on developing the four language skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The ability to communicate in simple written and spoken Spanish is promoted through the use of a multimedia-based immersion program.

  • Elementary Spanish

    Intended for students with some previous experience in Spanish, this course presents an accelerated introduction to the basic elements of the language and a study of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. The four language skills, i.e., speaking, listening, reading, and writing, are stressed. A multimedia-based immersion program facilitates the acquisition of basic fluency and accurate pronunciation.

  • Second Year Spanish

    Students continue to study grammar and vocabulary, and emphasis is placed on written and oral expression using correct sentence structure. Through a continuation of the multimedia-based immersion program started in the first year, students study Spanish-American culture while building the four language skills.

  • Second Year Spanish, Honors

    Students pursue an accelerated study of intermediate and advanced grammar through a continuation of the multimedia-based immersion program started in the first year and finish the year by reading a collection of short stories by well known Spanish and Spanish American authors.

  • Third Year Spanish

    The purpose of the third year Spanish curriculum is to facilitate language acquisition through grammar review, study of historic and contemporary Hispanic cultures, and literature. This course is the bridge between the language courses of the first two years and the history, civilization, and literature courses at the fourth year level and beyond. Students undertake a full grammar assessment and review, as well as write various types of compositions, and make different types of oral presentations using formal and informal language.

  • Spanish For Heritage Speakers

    This one-term course is specifically designed for students who are new to Choate and can speak Spanish but have received little or no formal education in the language. Students who were raised in Spanish-speaking homes or educated in English-speaking schools in Hispanic countries are ideal candidates for this course, the primary purpose of which is to hone students’ writing and reading abilities, as well as to expand their academic vocabulary via literature and cultural content. All four language skills (reading, speaking, writing, listening) are developed with a strong review of grammar and orthography. After completion of this class, students are placed into an appropriate next course based on the recommendation of the department.

  • Third Year Spanish, Honors

    The purpose of the third year Spanish curriculum is to facilitate language acquisition through grammar review, study of historic and contemporary Hispanic cultures, and literature. This honors level course stresses reading comprehension, oral-aural skills, and composition style. Students complete a full grammar review, write various types of compositions, and make regular oral presentations. They then use these skills to explore a variety of modern literary genres.

  • Spanish American Studies

    In this course students examine the history, political structure, and economy of Spanish America with a focus on developing presentation and conversational skills. Students work individually and in groups on diverse oral projects such as a mock trial, history-based skits, Power Point presentations on specific countries, and regular oral presentations on figures important to the history and culture of Latin America. A variety of materials are used in class including a textbook of culture and civilization, literary works by Spanish American authors including Pablo Neruda and Gabriel Garcia Marquez, films such as The Official Story and The Mission, and current events information from newspapers and the Internet. During the fall term there is a geographical overview of all Hispanic countries and an introduction to pre-Columbian civilizations. Over the winter term the conquest, colonization, and independence of Hispanic countries are studied. The spring term takes a thematic approach to the history of the 20th century. Spanish grammar is reviewed but is not the focus of the course.

  • Spanish World Literature, Honors

    This course is designed to expose students with a strong background in the Spanish language to contemporary literature from the Spanish-speaking world. While focusing on literature, students also discuss the social and historical contexts of the pieces read. In addition, emphasis is placed on vocabulary acquisition as well as on refining the students’ written expression by practice with higher-level grammatical structures. Students who have successfully completed the third year of the language or who have completed the second year and have participated in study abroad or summer program in Spain and have the recommendation of the department are eligible to enroll in this honors course. The literature studied in this sequence prepares students who plan to pursue the AP Spanish literature course in the future.

  • Cinema of Dissent In Spain

    After a brief introduction to the dictatorship implications of Francisco Franco’s 36-year-long dictatorship, which followed the Spanish Civil War (1936-1939), this course focuses on the cinema of dissent of the post-war era. In contrast to films sponsored by the Franquist government, the films of directors such as Berlanga, Bardem, Saura and Erice presented a much more critical look at the social problems of Spain in the 1950s, 1960s, and early 1970s. Students complete preparatory readings, view the films, work with related vocabulary and expressions from the movie scripts (when possible), and discuss specific themes of the films. Assessment is based on class participation as well as quizzes, short in-class writings, tests and comparative papers. This course is intended for non-native, non-heritage speakers of Spanish who have successfully completed the fourth year level or its equivalent.

  • Contemporary Cinema of Argentina

    Argentina is a fascinating country that has experienced much economic and social upheaval in the last decades. The country was profoundly affected by the “dirty war” in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when thousands of people “disappeared” or were tortured by the military junta. After a brief introduction to this and other important events in 20th century Argentina, the class views and discusses five to six films, dealing with topics such as the “dirty war” as well as the country’s ongoing economic, social and political troubles. Assessment is based on oral participation in class as well as homework, vocabulary quizzes, short in-class writings and comparative papers or tests. Homework includes preparatory readings related to historical information and background of the films. Occasional short oral presentations are also assigned. This course is intended for non-native, non-heritage speakers of Spanish who have successfully completed the fourth year level or its equivalent.

  • Contemporary Spanish Language Film

    This advanced course is designed to promote greater understanding about selected cultural topics concerning the Spanish-speaking world as they relate to specific cultural and historical frameworks. Films are used to enhance listening comprehension, provide opportunities for writing and conversation practice, and promote cultural understanding in a historical context. The films have been selected from different parts of the Spanish-speaking world. Students view films in their entirety in class. Portions of the films’ scripts may be used to further vocabulary development and review specific grammar topics. Nightly assignments are devoted to writing about the films viewed and background readings. Class work consists of viewing and discussing the films, class presentations, and pair and group activities. Assessments include quizzes, short writing assignments, class presentations, tests and comparative papers. This course is intended for non-native, non-heritage speakers of Spanish who have successfully completed the fourth year level or its equivalent.

  • AP Spanish Language and Culture

    Students work to improve Spanish language skills and cultural literacy through the study of a variety of authentic print, audio and audio-visual resources, including literature, magazine articles, news casts, and essays. Students engage in daily discussions exclusively in the target language and produce written and spoken communication ranging from oral presentations to persuasive essays. The accurate interpretation of authentic resources at an advanced level is a major goal of the course and is practiced and measured routinely. The course is organized around six college board prescribed thematic units: Global Challenges, Science and Technology, Contemporary Life, Families and Communities, Public and Personal Identities, and Beauty and Aesthetics. Students are encouraged to confirm mastery of Spanish language skills and cultural knowledge by sitting for the AP Spanish language and culture exam in May.

  • AP Spanish Literature and Culture

    This course provides a survey of Peninsular Spanish, Spanish American, and U.S. Hispanic literature, from medieval times to the present, in preparation for the AP Spanish Literature and Culture Examination. Students develop critical reading and analytical writing skills while exploring the texts in historical and cultural contexts.

  • Don Quijote De La Mancha, Honors

    This course is dedicated to a detailed reading and analysis of Miguel de Cervantes’ famous two-volume masterpiece, Don Quijote de la Mancha. Students undertake an intensive reading of the novel, give regular oral presentations in class, and write analytical essays on different aspects of the novel and its historical setting.

  • Contemporary Issues

    This term elective introduces third and fourth form students to major contemporary issues facing America and the world, the lifelong habit of reading the daily newspaper, and the skills of good public speaking. The course focuses on four to six issues per term and uses the following different forms of public speaking presentations: speeches to inform, speeches to persuade, extemporaneous speeches, oral reports, debates, discussions, and role plays. Sample topics include: globalization, human rights and genocide, global warming, religious revivalism and fundamentalism, drug trafficking, immigration, the crisis in Iraq/ Iran, file sharing, and nuclear proliferation. This course fulfills the requirement in contemporary global studies.

  • World History

    This course is a survey of world history from the post-Classical period to the present. Multicultural in nature, the course examines the development and interaction of the major cultures of Asia, India, the Muslim world, Europe, Africa, and the Americas through the centuries. This course introduces students to the various skills necessary for historical work. Special emphasis is placed on developing a student’s ability to read critically, write analytically, engage in independent research, and to make effective oral arguments. In addition, collaborative work is an important element of this course. By utilizing primary and secondary sources, film, literature, art, and a field trip to an art museum, students are presented with a variety of voices and materials for exploring historical study. This course prepares students for subsequent work in history.

  • World History, Honors: A Chronological Approach

    This course is a chronological survey of world history from the Mongol Empire of the 13th century to the present. Multicultural in nature, the course examines the development and interaction of the major cultures of Asia, India, the Muslim world, Europe, Africa, and the Americas through the centuries. Within the basic chronology, the material is arranged topically and thematically. Individual and collaborative projects encourage students to examine particular areas of history in great depth. The course uses primary and secondary sources, as it emphasizes the development of critical reading, writing, research, and oral presentation skills. The development of these skills prepares students for subsequent work in history.

  • World History, Honors: A Thematic Approach

    The thematic approach to World History is designed to give students a better understanding of the current world by examining a major theme in global development each term. The fall term focuses on economic and social history with a focus on the use of historical narrative. The course examines the shift in global trade once dominated by China and the Middle East to a modern system based on Western industrialization. During the winter, students explore political history and the use of historical discourse or primary source works. Focus is on the transition from monarchies to governments by popular mandate, and the totalitarian variants that resulted from that transition. The spring term is dedicated to understanding the dynamics of the 20th century with a focus on the frequency and depth of violence that characterized much of the time period. Students evaluate how violence was able to create social change. Each term students examine the origins, impact of cross-cultural contacts, and contemporary issues related to the major theme. The development of skills used by historians—critical reading, writing, research, and presentation skills—is emphasized. Individual and collaborative projects provide students with opportunities to explore issues in great depth. This course does not use a textbook; rather, students are exposed to a wide variety of primary and secondary source materials in the form of anchor books or course packs.

  • AP United States History

    This course is a chronological survey attentive to the political, economic, cultural, social, and constitutional developments by which the United States achieved independence, became a nation, and grew into a world power since 1898 and to superpower status since 1945. Students learn how to: 1) read both contemporary and past writings, 2) take notes on both reading and class discussion, 3) make reasoned interpretations about the causes and consequences of historic events, 4) research both secondary and primary sources, and 5) write and speak analytically and persuasively. While all teachers follow a core curriculum that covers the essential topics of American political, social, economic, intellectual, and diplomatic history, a variety of methods is employed in the many sections of the course.

  • United States History

    This course is a chronological survey attentive to the political, economic, cultural, social, and constitutional developments by which the United States achieved independence, became a nation, and grew into a world power since 1898 and to superpower status since 1945. Students learn how to: 1) read both contemporary and past writings, 2) take notes on both reading and class discussion, 3) make reasoned interpretations about the causes and consequences of historic events, 4) research both secondary and primary sources, and 5) write and speak analytically and persuasively. While all teachers follow a core curriculum that covers the essential topics of American political, social, economic, intellectual, and diplomatic history, a variety of methods is employed in the many sections of the course.

  • American Studies (AP United States History)

    This interdepartmental course is an alternative to AP U.S. History and Honors American Literature and Composition and is for fifth form students who wish to pursue a detailed study of United States history, literature, and culture. Students are recommended for the American Studies program by their previous teachers and must meet the honors criteria of the English and history departments. The program fulfills the fifth form English and the United States history requirements. The course is taught in double periods and earns three course credits in both English and history. (Students enrolled in American Studies are prepared to take the AP United States History Examination.)

  • From Megaphone to iPhone: American Social History in the 20th Century

    What were the major events and trends that helped shape American society throughout the 20th century? How have Hollywood and television highlighted (and sometimes even helped create) social values? How have technological innovations affected life in America? Relying almost exclusively on 20th century primary sources, such as letters, film clips, TV clips, advertisements (both print and TV), music and radio shows, this course looks at these issues as well as changing concepts of race and gender, advertising as a major social force, the impact of immigration, and the role of popular music as it examines and chronicles American society from the dawn of the 20th century to 1999.

  • Constitutional Law, Honors

    This course explores the evolution of the United States Supreme Court and its influence on the American people. For the first third of the term, students read a history of the High Court and write several short papers on topics in constitutional history. In the latter portion of the course, the class resolves itself into a “Mock Court” program, in which students argue landmark cases decided by the real Court in the 20th century and later. When presenting cases as a lawyer, students research the legal background, prepare a one-page argumentative brief, and engage in oral argument before the rest of the class. The remaining students serve as the Court’s justices who deliberate on each of the several dozen cases handled over the course of the term.

  • American Diplomacy

    After an examination of the government’s foreign policy-making apparatus and a discussion of the role of international law in the modern world, this course reviews American foreign policy from the Spanish American War to the present. Major topics include the Big Stick policy, the Open Door, World War I, the isolationism vs. internationalism debate of the 1920s and 1930s, World War II, and the creation of the Cold War containment policy. The course concludes with an exercise in which students examine the complexities facing American policy makers in the post-Cold War world. Primary sources are used extensively and both traditional and revisionist interpretations of the American role are examined.

  • The United States in Vietnam, 1945-1975

    The Vietnam War remains a compelling chapter in the recent history of this nation. This course is a study of the political, diplomatic, and military aspects of the American involvement in Vietnam and the war’s impact on the home front. Particular attention is paid to the cultural and historical traditions of Southeast Asia, the French colonial experience in Indochina, and the elements of American decision-making both in Washington and Vietnam. In addition to historical texts, the course employs fiction and film in its exploration of the Vietnam War.

  • Modern Japan: from Samurai to Sony

    This course explores Japan’s transformation from feudal state to Asian military power from 1800 to 1945 and then its rise from bitter defeat in World War II to become an economic superpower. We consider how traditional Japanese culture has shaped the nation’s business and industrial successes and failures in the postwar era. Other focal points of the course include the changing status of women, race, and racism in the Pacific War, and Japan’s relationship with the United States. While its primary focus is historical, the course explores many facets of Japanese life, including religious, artistic, and literary elements.

  • Black Experiences In America

    This course presents an historical overview of the experiences of black and other minority populations in America. By reading primary source documents and essayists such as W.E.B. DuBois, Audre Lorde, and Ronald Takaki, students examine the emergence of marginalized political cultures in the United States from early America to the present day. Special attention is paid to histories of oppression and resistance; the role of education and religion in political activism; cultural contributions of minority groups; and the need for social justice in a diverse society. Students explore the writings of important American authors along with music, artwork, and film. Students are required to write short papers and lead assigned seminar discussions.

  • The Holocaust

    This course explores the emergence, evolution, varieties, underlying causes, and means of confronting and coming to terms with genocide and other crimes against humanity in the modern world. Particular attention is paid to the roots of European anti-Semitism and the Nazi attempt to exterminate all of European Jewry in the mid-20th century. From this historical “case-study,” we examine definitions, causes, consequences, and the ways by which people explain their experiences of oppression and genocide by comparing the Holocaust to other historical examples, past and present. Case studies could include the mass murder of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire; the genocide in Cambodia perpetrated by the Khmer Rouge; and the genocide in Rwanda. The approach and the materials are interdisciplinary and each student does independent research. While a background in modern European history is helpful, it is not required.

  • The American West, Honors

    The lure and promise of “the West” have been important forces in shaping American history and culture. Drawing on a number of primary and secondary sources, this course examines the development of the trans-Mississippi West from the 1840s to the present. We look at a number of aspects of the American West, including such topics as the Gold Rush, Native American Wars, cowboys and “cowtowns,” contributions from and clashes between various cultures in the West, changing gender roles, exploitation and/or conservation of natural resources and the role of railroads. The course also examines the modern West by looking at such issues as immigration, tourism, and “green” energy. The course concludes by looking at how and why the images and myths of the West have become such a pervasive part of American culture in such places as art, film, literature, television and advertising.

  • Islamic Civilizations of the Middle East, Honors

    Mecca, Damascus, Baghdad, Isfahan, and Constantinople have all served as capitals for some of the most significant Islamic civilizations of the Middle East. From the rise of Islam through the fall of the Ottoman Empire, this course examines the values, traditions, and development of several Middle Eastern Islamic cultures and empires. Through the use of primary sources and visual materials, students explore the development of Middle Eastern Islamic religious thought, socio-political institutions, and cultural expressions such as art, literature, and architecture. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding works of art in their historical and social contexts. By studying a variety of primary and secondary sources students gain an understanding and appreciation for the complexity of many of the Islamic cultures and civilizations that have called the Middle East home.

  • The Greening of America: The Environmental Movement, Honors

    The environmental movement in the United States has been motivated by a wide range of factors, including the natural beauty of the country, the destruction of some of that beauty, the work of naturalists, ethicists, theologians, historians and authors, catastrophic events that have captured the public’s attention, and activists schooled and fueled by the sweeping changes in the 1960s. This cross-disciplinary course weaves together all of these perspectives as it traces the development of the environmental movement in the United States and the impact of key people and events on this movement and on the environment itself. The course draws from many disciplines as it examines historical, political, ethical, religious, economic and cultural aspects of the environmental movement. This course includes an experiential component that involves contact with the natural world on our campus and potentially beyond.

  • AP European History: 1715-1871

    This term’s course sees Europe approaching the apogee of its power and explores some of the themes associated with that development: the scientific revolution; the Enlightenment; the drive for material and technological betterment that created the Atlantic economy and the Industrial Revolution; and the impatience with inefficient political systems that spawned the revolutions of 1775, 1789, 1848, and 1871 and saw the first triumphs of liberalism and nationalism. We look also at romanticism and the social transformation wrought by industrial capitalism.

  • AP European History: 1300-1740

    The course begins with Europe’s emergence from the catastrophes of the late Middle Ages into the period of the New Monarchies and the brilliant culture of the Italian and North European Renaissance. Students explore the Protestant-Catholic conflicts and the social changes unleashed by Luther’s and Calvin’s Reformation. Further course topics include: the Europe-wide wars of the 17th century; the triumph of divine right and absolute monarchy; the emergence of constitutionalism in Holland and England; and the uses of Baroque art and architecture.

  • War and Warfare

    This course examines war from ancient times to the present, looking at the impact of war on human culture and the impact of culture on war. In addition to a survey of significant battles, the class considers questions such as what are the main causes of war and how have various cultures thought about war? Is there an inherently superior “Western way of war” as argued by Victor Davis Hanson or is military success determined in large part by technological innovation, as argued by Max Boot? What are the human dynamics involved in war? Can war be limited and controlled?

  • Women’s Studies in a Global Perspective, Honors

    From the West to the Far East, to Africa, the Islamic world and beyond, this course engages students in an examination of historical conditions, cultural norms, and social and economic institutions that define women’s status and identity. By taking a multicultural, global approach, students gain an understanding of the issues facing women throughout the world today, their historical context, how women’s experiences reflect larger social issues, and the ways in which activism seeks to address the obstacles women face. We explore how the processes of globalization have more recently affected women of different ethnicity, culture, and class in often inequitable ways, and how the development of women’s and feminist movements around the world is taking place within the context of globalization.

  • The Rise of Modern China, Honors

    After a brief overview of China’s republican and early communist eras and ideas, this course examines the question of what went uniquely wrong with Mao Zedong’s vision of leading China to a Marxist utopia and, ultimately, how China has risen to its present status as a global economic powerhouse. Students use period literature, documentary and feature films, newly published autobiographies, as well as the interactive Internet materials of Yale and Columbia Universities to understand this transformation. Topics range from the 1949 communist ascendancy, the Cultural Revolution, and the Tiananmen “crackdown,” to the capitalist reforms of Deng Xiaoping. Attention is given to current issues: China’s integration into the World Trade Organization (WTO), its human rights record, and the environmental consequences of the PRC’s rapid modernization of the last two decades.

  • The Civil War and Reconstruction

    This course examines the military, political, social, and economic history of the Civil War as well as the critical postwar era of Reconstruction. Important themes include the challenges facing Black America, the impact of the war on women, the struggle of political parties for power, and the emergence of a pattern of segregation that would control the South and affect the nation for the next century.

  • A Cultural History of the Atlantic World, 1400 – 1800, Honors

    Atlantic history is an increasingly dynamic field of historical scholarship that examines the various contacts and interactions among West Africans, indigenous Americans, and Europeans between 1400 and 1800. Through reading, writing, and classroom discussion, this course addresses the fact that many aspects of early European, African, and indigenous American interactions have been misunderstood, minimized, ignored or denied by (American) historians. To address this problem, this course emphasizes the role of West Africans and indigenous Americans as active and equal participants with Europeans in fashioning a distinct Atlantic culture. Students learn about the constantly shifting and often volatile mixture of people and pathogens, labor systems and crops, nations and empires that shaped Latin American, Caribbean, North American, African, and European history. Particular emphasis is placed upon the popular classes—craftsmen, apprentices, wage laborers, sailors, indentured servants, slaves, farmers, peasants, domestics, and vagabonds—of both genders and of many races, ethnicities, and nationalities in order to evoke and develop the interests of all members of the class.

  • The Use and Abuse of Power

    This course examines the nature of power—what it is, how it is gained, used, and abused; also important to this ongoing discussion is the distinction and relationship between power and authority. Keeping as its focus issues pertaining to the 20th and 21st centuries, this course investigates power as exercised by the government, the media, and cultural and economic elites, as well as within human relationships. Topics of possible examination include race, class, and gender issues, religion, militia and neo-fascist movements, and the changing moral and ethical climate.

  • AP European History: 1871-1980

    Europe reached its late 19th century apogee with the unifications of Italy and Germany and the New Imperialism. Then failure to resolve the issues of nationalism vs. internationalism, democracy vs. statism, and capitalism vs. socialism brings about the two greatest wars in history, leaving Europe impotent and straddled by the new global powers, the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. We follow these disasters and the recovery of Europe through the period of the Cold War. Other topics include: the Bolshevik Revolution, the Great Depression, Modernism, totalitarian regimes, and some of the myriad ways in which Europe’s history is becoming inseparable from world history.

  • Moral Reasoning

    This introductory ethics course examines the process of moral reasoning. A range of classical and contemporary ethical theories serves as a basis for the discussion of personal and social issues. Topics such as capital punishment, stem cell research, and environmental ethics are presented in a way that helps students understand and appreciate various points of view as well as formulate and express their own values.

  • Philosophy, Honors

    Philosophy is an attempt to ask and answer in an imaginative and disciplined way some of the important questions of life. This course investigates what it means to be human, the fundamental nature of God and reality, the sources and limits of our knowledge, and the concept of what is right and good in our lives. Content and process are given equal emphasis in this demanding course, and both historical ideas and personal reflection are stressed to help students examine these topics constructively.

  • World Religions

    This course exposes students to the beliefs, practices, ethics, and history of four major world religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and Hinduism. Students study each of the religions in order to gain an understanding of its meaning to individual believers and its impact on human history. The course utilizes resources available through technology as well as a standard text.

  • Peacemakers: Non-Violence And Religious Thought

    Designed to improve students’ ability in moral and religious thinking, this course examines historical, theological, and philosophical alternatives to violence. Drawing on the teaching of the world’s major religious traditions and examining the writings of seminal thinkers like Martin Luther King, Jr., Henry David Thoreau, Dorothy Day, Mohandas Gandhi, and Mother Teresa, students are exposed to the idea that non-violence can be a force for social justice and an alternative to the violence, in its many forms, that permeates the world.

  • Hinduism, Buddhism, and Taoism

    This course is a survey of the basic beliefs and practices of three influential religions of Asia. Special attention is paid to the cultures from which they have emerged. The historical development, ethics, and basic cosmology are explained. The meaning of the fundamental ideas of each is explored, and students are helped to develop a better understanding of what the followers of each system really believe.

  • Spiritual Journeys

    We humans have continually sought meaning in our lives and a connection with the divine. We ask the questions: Why am I here? Where am I going? This course examines the quest for spiritual meaning and understanding through the study of biography, memoir, scripture, and film. The course covers a wide variety of religious and spiritual traditions and provides a range of perspectives within those traditions. Students are exposed to the reflections of noted religious figures as well as everyday seekers and are encouraged to be tolerant of new perspectives and to reflect on own their spiritual questions. This course culminates in a final project.

  • AP Macroeconomics

    These courses examine basic economic concepts and macroeconomic theory, and serve as the department’s introduction to the field of economics. Students begin by studying the fundamental concepts of scarcity, opportunity cost, production possibilities curves, and supply and demand. They then focus on the U.S. national economy and its links to the global economy using a variety of measures of economic performance and examining economic fluctuations and economic growth. After learning the Aggregate Demand and Supply model, students analyze the impacts of fiscal and monetary policies, as well as other macroeconomic policies, on the nation’s economy.

  • Macroeconomics

    These courses examine basic economic concepts and macroeconomic theory, and serve as the department’s introduction to the field of economics. Students begin by studying the fundamental concepts of scarcity, opportunity cost, production possibilities curves, and supply and demand. They then focus on the U.S. national economy and its links to the global economy using a variety of measures of economic performance and examining economic fluctuations and economic growth. After learning the Aggregate Demand and Supply model, students analyze the impacts of fiscal and monetary policies, as well as other macroeconomic policies, on the nation’s economy.

  • International Economics, Honors

    Students study the reasons for trade, the balance of trade, and exchange rates, as well as government policies that affect trade and exchange rates. Students also examine different economic systems and economic development. To analyze the effects of these theories and policies and their international ramifications, students research different industrialized and developing countries.

  • AP Microeconomics

    Students study consumer decision-making, the theory of the firm, and different types of markets for products and factors of production. They also examine government policy in different markets. As a case study, the students analyze a company and participate in a term-long simulation in which they run their own firm in a competitive market. Students communicate with suppliers and customers via email, keep their financial records on a computer spreadsheet, and at the end of the term prepare an annual report for their firm on the computer.

  • Advanced Topics in Economics, Honors

    Students further their study of both macroeconomics and microeconomics by examining recent developments in economic theory and policies. This extension of topics studied in Macroeconomics and Microeconomics helps prepare students for the AP Examinations. Students also examine the financial markets.

  • Entrepreneurship

    In this course students learn about starting and managing a small business. In the classroom, they study the basics of business management through readings, discussion and homework exercises. They then see these principles applied in the real world through guest speakers and visits to local businesses. By the end of the term, students develop their own ideas for a business and write a business plan.

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Our program is for everyone – from the introductory student to the student already at the college level. Our goal is to meet your needs, interests, and passions – and our teachers do this day in and day out.